Transcriptionists: KNOW YOUR WORTH!

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$240 sounds like a decent payout for a single transcription job, right?

EXCEPT when they have 30 hours worth of audio — and only want to pay you $8 per audio hour.

Can we do the math here?
There are 60 minutes in an hour.
So if you divide $8 by 60 minutes, that would equal approximately 13.3333E¢ per audio minute.

Now – anyone who has been transcribing for a while knows that standard time it takes to type a proper transcription is anywhere between 4 and 6 times the length of audio. That being said – now you need to divide 13¢ by…let’s say 4.
That’s about 3.3333E¢ per minute.

Now multiply that by 60
(remember – there are 60 minutes in an hour)
What does that equal? A whopping $2

So, friends:  

When’s the last time you made $2 an hour for skilled work?

Transcribing is not just the ability to type fast.  It is active LISTENING and typing accurately.

Adding time stamps.  Labeling speakers.

It is making sure that the format is correct for each client.

It is sometimes listening to the entire audio one more time to make sure you did the best you could with sometimes less-than-perfect audio.

Oftentimes there is an investment that we make to get the best transcription software and working foot pedal.

Just saying KNOW YOUR WORTH.

And if you’re trying to hire someone at that rate – remember – you’re probably getting exactly what you pay for.

Past and Present: Figuring out my online identity

So I was going through my LinkedIn profile and something became glaringly clear:

I have a split personality.

Split Personality by HGEBlindWolf via DeviantArt

You see, when I first developed my profile, I was very much into the music scene and many of my connections are people from my Westminster Choir College days, musicians whom I had worked with or admired, and so on.  It was great for singing opportunities, watching for auditions, and the like.  It’s been several years since I put away my voice for other pursuits.

Circumstances, as they were made it important to find work-from-home jobs.  Writing, transcribing, moderating — all things I had done when my children were very young.  So my profile connections include published and aspiring authors, bloggers, editors, publishers, freelance artists and writers.

If my LinkedIn profile was my resume I’m certain a prospective employer would be very confused. The past endorses certain skills and the present endorses others.  Is she into music or is she a serious writer?  Oh, fie these years of life and experience!  I have too many identities!  And when it comes to a professional online profile, never the twain shall meet.  In one way it could be considered a good thing to be well-rounded and broad in interests.  In another way, I could be considered scatterbrained.

Would I hire me?

How does one amalgamate one’s past with one’s present and hope for a harmonious future in this freelance job market?

Do I have the time to recreate a new profile and leave the past behind?  Do I want to?

But if I don’t, will that inhibit the direction of my recreated/recycled self?

Who the hell am I anyway?

Do You Know How To Edit AND Proofread Your Story?

Writers In The Storm Blog

proofreading, Writers In The Stormby Jenny Hansen, @JennyHansenCA

Editing and Proofreading: Two separate processes that equal one great story.

Like most writers, I hang out with a boatload of other writers. Still, I never saw much of other peoples’ works in progress until I coordinated a contest several years ago. Coordinating contests changed the way I see writing. Period. It was a window into both sides of the submission process.

Plus, I saw firsthand one of the important talents that separates the amateurs from the professionals: the ability to both edit and proofread.

In novel-writing, editing is King and proofreading is Queen.

Professional writers, whether published or pre-published know: You never get a second chance to make a first impression.They work hard to make a great first impression.

As a contest coordinator, I had to read every piece of paper sent between the judges and the contestants to ensure everyone played nice with each other. (It should…

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This Is The Kind Of Competition Publishers Want

David Gaughran

Source: Flickr Source: Flickr

Since the huge shift to online purchasing and e-books, a common meme is that there is some kind of “discoverability” problem in publishing.

The funny thing is readers don’t seem to have any problem finding books they love. Any readers I talk to have a time problem – reading lists a mile long and never enough hours in the day to read all the great books they are discovering.

The real discoverability problem in publishing is that readers are discovering (and enjoying) books that don’t come from the large publishers. What these publishers have is a competition problem not a discoverability problem.

Amazon regularly gets slated for purported anti-competitive actions, but it has done more to create the digital marketplace than any other company. It has also done more to open up that marketplace to vendors of all shapes and sizes than any other company. Small publishers and…

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How to Support an Author’s New Book: 11 Ideas For You

Great tips on how to support an author’s new book.

Writers In The Storm Blog

By Chuck Sambuchino

large_5595133805My Writer’s Digest coworker, Brian A. Klems, recently geared up for the release of his first book — a humorous guide for fathers called OH BOY, YOU’RE HAVING A GIRL: A DAD’S SURVIVAL GUIDE TO RAISING DAUGHTERS (Adams Media). On top of that, my coworker Robert Brewer (editor of Writer’s Market) recently got a publishing deal for a book of his poetry.

So I find myself as a cheerleader for my writing buddies — trying to do what I can to help as their 2013 release dates approach. I help in two ways: 1) I use my own experience of writing & publishing books to share advice on what they can expect and plan for; and 2) I simply do whatever little things I can that help in any way.

This last part brings up an important point: Anyone can support an author’s…

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Freelance writing issue: If you wanted me to lie why didn’t you say so?

So here I am.  I had found a quickie book review job that I knew I could read and write about in a day.  A quick $10.

The requirement was to write an honest review and post them to the usual places and any networking sites that might be appropriate for the review.  The end goal is really to get traffic to their book and boost sales, right?  shh

So I read the book.  A put-downable book.  Anyone who knows me KNOWS that I cannot put down a book once I start it!  I will take it to the bathroom with me, I eat while I read, I go without sleep until I read from cover to cover.  I must get to the end.  It’s just how I’m wired.

There are exceptions to this:

  1. When I am part of a critiquing group and we go chapter by chapter because we want to present our best work for publication.
  2. When I’ve got my editing hat on.
  3. When the book needs improvement (Note: I did not say ‘bad’ I said ‘needs improvement’).

Needless to say – I read the book: a lesbian erotic romance.  I wrote a fair but honest review and began to post as directed.  Not five minutes later I received a ‘cease and desist’ email saying they didn’t like my review.  We went back and forth with some communication and before I knew it I was being attacked.  Apparently I’m biased.  I have a thing against lesbians.  I don’t know what I’m talking about because their other paid reviewers gave them 4 or 5 stars.

In all sincerity the book did not warrant 4 stars.  I had a hard time giving it 3!  There were grammatical errors and word flow issues.  There were areas that were too abrupt in their transitions.  The sex was hot but it could have been hotter and there was a distinct lack of synonyms.  The characters could have benefited from a back story.  The author used a proverbial ten-foot stick to poke at LGBT issues like family acceptance, religion, and community but never gave us any meat on the bone.  If those issues aren’t what propel and shape your characters’ behavior and action then why the hell did you mention it in the first place?

Isn’t this all stuff their editor should have addressed PRIOR to publication?

Now I don’t have a problem with paid reviews.  You do what you have to in order to get your body of work noticed.  But if you want HONESTY then you’re going to need thicker skin when someone doesn’t think you are brilliant.  It’s going to happen!  Am I brilliant all the time?  Hell no – and I’ll be the first to admit it.

But here’s the point I’m trying to get at.  If you want honesty and don’t like what you hear then just take it, chew on it, investigate it and either work on it or dismiss it.  Don’t attack someone because you said ‘Let me have it’ then cry when you got it.

On the other hand: I’m a creative writer!  I could have lied if that is what you really wanted.  Your directive could easily have been:  For $10 read my book.  Give me 5 stars.  Stroke my ego and let the world know how brilliant my book is!  If it was worthy of 5 stars I would gladly endorse it.  If it’s crap I will post under a pen name.  Easy Peasy!

In the end I told them to keep their $10 but I am compelled to leave my review alone.

Since then they have revised their job posting to include “Do not bite the hand that feeds you.”

Amusing!

I’m not a mean person.  I am never purposefully mean!  As human nature goes, there is a huge part of me begging to be spiteful to their delicate sensibilities and post the review on my blog.  I know it would probably bother them considerably – especially in light of their (over)reaction.  Ultimately, I am a better person for stopping here.  Karma is a fickle bitch.  I just want to finish with this quote by Henri Frederic Amiel

“Life is short and we have never too much time for gladdening the hearts of those who are travelling the dark journey with us.  Oh be swift to love, make haste to be kind.”

:: Meredith steps off the soap box now ::

Guest Blogger: Top 10 U.S. Tanks of All Time

Ford Model 1918

Ford Model 1918

 

 

 

Quite a bit of research went into this blog but I am proud to present:

Top Ten U.S. Tanks of All Time

It’s an honor to be guest blogging at Part-Time-Commander.com
For great articles and insight for all things Army, check out Chuck Holmes’ site.